Let The Sun Shine In

Pekani. Gemini. USA. Eighteen. Journalist. DFTBA. *headdesk*

Read the Printed Word!

beads flowers freedom happiness

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1 day ago

But he understood at last what Dumbledore had been trying to tell him. It was, he thought, the difference between being dragged into the arena to face a battle to the death and walking into the arena with your head held high. Some people, perhaps, would say that there was little to choose between the two ways, but Dumbledore knew — and so do I, thought Harry, with a rush of fierce pride, and so did my parents — that there was all the difference in the world.

(Source: daniels-gillies, via darlingbythesea)

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1 day ago

"Other people are not medicine."

It took me 9 years to figure that out  (via shante-atthedisco)

(Source: slutsandsinners, via certainlymad)

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1 day ago

"No matter what you say or what you do, when I’m alone I’d rather be with you."

Childish Gambino (via hippiegroove)

(via darlingbythesea)

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1 day ago

lifeofadyke:

theoddoneouut:

ellosteph:

A game of Never Have I Ever that takes a twist, and will leave you with chills at the end. 

that is not what i expected, woah

This is too important to ignore

(via peasantrelations)

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1 day ago

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence
eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence
eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence
eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence
eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence
eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence
eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence
eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence
eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 

For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.

In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

(via peasantrelations)

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1 day ago

"Every time you show your feelings, you apologize. Have you ever had an emotion in your life that you weren’t ashamed of?"

R.J Anderson, Ultraviolet  (via sassyfag)

(Source: baker-94, via certainlymad)

♥ 44463

1 day ago

tittybandit:

cosbyykidd:

wherethenotsowildsthingsare:

redtormenta:

5ft1:

mileysblackfriend:

i honestly hate vine so much

Good fucking BYE!!!!

SHE GOT THE HAIRCUT!!!!

She dooooo!

she got the haircut *rubs hands like birdman*

(via thehealthywarrior)

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(Source: trans-par-en-t, via xhippykid)

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1 day ago

(Source: 4gifs, via m0rtality)

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1 day ago

healthy-free-soul:

Obsessively trying to eat strictly healthy food and micromanaging all your meals is NOT healthy. Being absolutely terrified of certain foods because they are not 100% “clean” is NOT healthy. Feeling bad for enjoying food, regardless of its nutritional value, is NOT HEALTHY.

(via fitbeliever)

♥ 222755

1 day ago

pizza:

vegbitch:

tonystarktrek:

thejollity:

FUN FACT!
Do you ever wonder why your lips and tongue sting a little when you’re eating pineapples? It’s because pineapples possess the enzyme bromelain, which breaks down meat proteins. 
Basically, when you eat pineapples, pineapples eat you right back.

Pineapples are so metal.

That explains a lot

I KNEW IT. IVE ALWAYS KNOWN PINEAPPLES WERE SUSPICIOUS AND I DIDN’T TRUST THEM. NO LOOK. THE PINEAPPLES ARE EATING US. WAKE UP PEOPLE. PINEAPPLES ARE DANGEROUS.

pizza:

vegbitch:

tonystarktrek:

thejollity:

FUN FACT!

Do you ever wonder why your lips and tongue sting a little when you’re eating pineapples? It’s because pineapples possess the enzyme bromelain, which breaks down meat proteins. 

Basically, when you eat pineapples, pineapples eat you right back.

Pineapples are so metal.

That explains a lot

I KNEW IT. IVE ALWAYS KNOWN PINEAPPLES WERE SUSPICIOUS AND I DIDN’T TRUST THEM. NO LOOK. THE PINEAPPLES ARE EATING US. WAKE UP PEOPLE. PINEAPPLES ARE DANGEROUS.

(via peasantrelations)

♥ 1342

1 day ago

thebootyclap:

queen-stacey:

domme-chronicles:

lipstickandligature:

This scene is one of my favourite things.

Yup :).

uh huh…

this is basically me any time a guy addresses himself as daddy in my presence. 

(Source: paulcassidys, via veganasana)

♥ 46484

1 day ago